Ikea You Not. We Want Your Parents Stuff: A Vintage Response

Ikea You Not. We Want Your Parents Stuff: A Vintage Response

IKEA You Not. We Want Your Parent’s Stuff: A Vintage Response By Melissa Sands with Duane Scott Cerny   For 24 months there has been an influx of articles about how nobody wants their parent’s old stuff. Every time I see this and read how IKEA has killed our industry, I wonder how much two years of misinformation from influential publications has hurt the vintage and secondhand industry.   We are a niche market without the marketing budget of IKEA.

Internet Trends for Vintage Part 1

Internet Trends for Vintage Part 1

Internet Trends Report Admittedly I didn’t hear about this report until Summer 2016. I learned, if you build apps or have anything to do with Silicon Valley, your business depends on this info. A new app can take 18 months to complete and if you were catering to something that’s declining, PROJECT OVER.     This report isn’t only about Silicon Valley. This report is serious. Even in the vintage business, it applies.     The Internet isn’t going anywhere. If

Leave Millennials alone.

Leave Millennials alone.

 Who’s your customer in 2027? Before I tell you, do you know who your customer is now? It’s the same person, Millennials. Since I started working shows I’ve heard about the awesome customer of days passed.  I think this happens in everything.  It was always better back in the day.  It’s true though, more money was spent on antiques and collectibles and there was more of an understanding of the history and nostalgia.  At first, it felt like everyone thought

Competition in the Business of Vintage

Competition in the Business of Vintage

 There is a lot of competition in the vintage industry.No doubt.Any niche market you decide to get involved with will be filled with people who are interested in what you do. If there is any demand, there will be competition. If you are in a niche with NO competition and you are killing it, it won’t be long before it shows up.What does that mean in the Vintage world? This is really simple and important and if you learn nothing else from

The Business of Vintage is Personal

The Business of Vintage is Personal

I was startled when she told me she was 91. She didn’t look a day over 75. Sharp as a tack with brilliant taste. I try to buy privately as much as I can, usually by referral. It’s the easiest way to acquire new merchandise for me.  Emotionally, it’s not always easy. Today I met Doris.  I learned about her life and it was a story of a solid happy life.  I bought some vintage clothing and handbags.  The furniture and objects